Mines Advisory Group (MAG)

During the period of the American Vietnam War, over half-a-million bombing missions dropped more than 5 million tons of ordnance. An estimated 30% of these munitions did not detonate.

Since the end of the U.S. war with Viet Nam in 1974, more than 38,000 people have been killed from contact with these, and another 64,000 people have been injured. Sixty-one provinces and cities still have land mines or UXO, and an average of 1,000 people are killed each year because of land mines or UXO.

Some of the bombs left over from the war have shapes that resemble toys, such as balls, making them hard to resist for curious kids. Many boys, traditionally charged to care for the family’s water buffalo, get killed or injured when their animal steps on a hidden piece of ordnance.

Assignment for MAG

Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG)

MAG, the largest civilian clearance agency conducting clearance operations in the country, has removed 115,587 items of UXO and 464 mines, cleared 6,861,664 m2 of land for development projects and visited 192,179 houses during operations in Provinces straddling the former demilitarised zone (DMZ).

At the end of hostilities with the US, the Vietnamese Military estimated that there was between 350,000 to 700,000 tonnes of UXO still scattered across the country.

Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG) Mines Advisory Group (MAG)